Norm Pattiz of PodcastOne: “We were looking at acquiring Stitcher.” – PCN Show 008

Norm PattizIn response to the article I posted yesterday about the recent dust up between PodcastOne and Stitcher, I was contacted today by a PodcastOne rep who said that the company’s Chairman/CEO, Norm Pattiz, was willing to do an interview to try and shed some light on the situation. I’m presenting that interview today (with Norm’s permission) as my November contribution to the Podcaster News Show.

Some highlights from our discussion:

  • PodcastOne was, at one point, considering acquiring Stitcher.
  • Stitcher is still syndicating some of PodcastOne’s show, despite PodcastOne’s request that they stop.
  • PodcastOne hasn’t seen any significant decrease in downloads since Sitcher removed PodcastOne’s shows.
  • Pattiz says Sitcher doesn’t have a “robust” revenue generating system.

Hear all of this and more in the full podcast episode below.

Original image by PeteSessa from Wikimedia, used under Creative Commons license.

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Women in Podcasting: Interview with Heather Bayer

Cottage Blogger Vacation Rental Success Podcast Podcasting NewsHeather Bayer is the host of the Vacation Rental Success podcast. It is part of the wealth of resources on her Cottage Blogger website, which is geared towards helping those who are vacation rental owners, vacation rental agencies and property managers, and vacation rental realtors. This is a topic that has not yet become saturated in podcasting.

When did you first start podcasting? What’s your experience in podcasting from then up to now?

I’d like to say it all started in 2006 because that’s when I first decided to do a podcast. I recently cleared out an old storage cupboard and found the original mixer I’d ordered from what used to be Radioshack, along with a microphone and a book called How to Start a Podcast. I remember getting so frustrated because I am not, and never have been, technically minded and while enthusiastic and motivated, I couldn’t figure out how to use the equipment. After a few weeks of trying and failing to find any training or tutorial that focused on the real beginner, I gave up.

Fast forward to 2012 and I was reading Pat Flynn’s blog and his experiences with podcasting, when I first heard about this guy called The Podcast Answer Man – Cliff Ravenscraft. From there it was an easy decision to sign up for his A-Z Course and spend a month immersed in getting set up and publishing the first episode of Vacation Rental Success.

From there the work really began. Cliff talks about the podcasters ‘wall’ and why many new shows fail to get beyond Episode 7 and I experienced exactly that. Over the first year episodes were published sporadically and by December 2013, there were only 7 – no wonder subscriber and download numbers were low!

We made a commitment at Cottage Blogger to publish consistently from January 2014 and were super-excited to release episode 50 in October. The show is in a niche market so we’ll never be in the million+ downloads-per-month club that some entrepreneur shows are reaching, but now we are fast approaching 35,000 downloads, mostly in the last 8 months, it’s really working for us.

What inspired you to become a podcaster?

I’m a lifelong learner and multi-tasker and found that so much information was being delivered through some great podcasts that I could listen to while driving, walking the dog, running, at the gym, at the airport and in the air….in fact everywhere. From shows about productivity techniques to lifestyle and motivational podcasts, there is something for everyone that is easily accessible via iTunes and some earbuds.

At the time, my niche was becoming a little more crowded with everyone delivering a similar message via blog posts so I wanted to do something different. The opportunity to reach a new audience through audio was wide open and I jumped at it. Once armed with the knowledge and resources to set it up, the rest was easy. I’m now inspired to help others to get started with their shows.

What kinds of things can listeners expect to hear on your Vacation Rental Success podcast? Is there a specific audience that would get the most from your show?

One of my recent guests described the vacation rental market as ‘a melting pot of complexity’ with over 5 million vacation home owners worldwide using rental as a means to create additional income. He called them ‘micro-businesses’. Given the growing interest in vacation rentals as a mainstream alternative to hotels and resorts, the opportunity has never been greater for vacation home owners to get into this business. So, anyone who has a second home, is thinking of investing in one, or already runs a VR business, would benefit from the information the show delivers.

I interview a range of guests from successful owners who share their experiences, to experts and suppliers in different parts of the industry. Shows have included interviews with a copywriter (for creating appealing listings), a professional photographer who shared tips on getting the best images of a property, social media gurus such as Sue B Zimmerman who explained how to use Instagram for marketing, and other leaders in the industry. I also offer tips from my experience of being a vacation rental home owner for over 20 years.

What words of wisdom do you have for women who want to get involved with podcasting?

This is what I am finding so exciting at the moment. Women are under-represented in podcasting and the opportunities are tremendous for them to get out there. I’m currently working with several vacation rental owners who are starting up their own podcasts in the travel and tourism sector (another category that has a long way to go before it gets saturated.)

Join a community where newbie and experienced podcasters hangout. I’ve found that people who are involved in this are so helpful and giving and are more than happy to offer advice and technical help if you get stuck.

I would also suggest that anyone interested in getting started goes to iTunes and checks out the great female podcasters who are rocking it over the airwaves. Listen to a few of them and their different styles. Elsie Escobar at Jessica Kupferman at She Podcasts offer a ton of help specifically directed at women podcasters.

PodcastOne vs. Stitcher: Shots Fired

PodcastOne LogoCelebrity-driven network PodcastOne made podcasting news yesterday when it announced it will be removing all of its shows as well as shows it represents to advertisers from the Stitcher streaming-media app. From a statement released by PodcastOne:

Stitcher continues to sell and distribute programming without the proper rights, consent and compensation PodcastOne and its talent are due.

And that:

(PodcastOne) has repeatedly tried to work with Stitcher, and requested the removal of programming without verbal or written consent to distribute, in addition to the discontinuance of video ads as post, pre-roll and pop-ups attributed to these podcasts. Stitcher continues to make PodcastOne programming available on the home screen of their app to listeners who are already ‘following’ the programs.

Also, PodcastOne CEO Norm Pattiz was quoted as saying:

In some cases, Stitcher has absolutely no rights to carry our programs, and in others, no rights to sell or monetize our exclusively represented content in any way. This has been an ongoing problem, and enough is enough. You can’t just steal content without permission. Podcasting is breaking through big time, not only with consumers but with advertisers as well. I see new players coming into the market, all touting technology that will allow them to grab podcasts for their subscribers. Let this be a message – make sure you have secured the rights from content suppliers before you distribute programing you don’t have the rights to.

I surveyed PodcastOne’s “Top 25″ shows and found that most of them are no longer listed with Stitcher. Exceptions include podcasts that don’t originate with PodcastOne, such as Radiolab and The Laura Ingraham Show.

PodcastOne’s stance is that Stitcher was using PodcastOne’s shows without the company’s consent. Given Pattiz’s statement, it looks like he’s unhappy with Stitcher running ads against PodcastOne’s content. Speculation has flooded podcasting forums since the news broke as to what exactly is happening here. Is PodcastOne falling back on its roots as a radio syndicator (Westwood One) and trying to get Stitcher to pay PodcastOne to distribute its shows? Did Stitcher offer PodcastOne any kind of revenue sharing for running ads against its content? If so, could the two parties not reach a mutually beneficial agreement? How do the shows PodcastOne represents for advertising feel about PodcastOne wanting them to leave Stitcher as well? The mind reels with possibilities.

Regardless, this isn’t the first time that Stitcher has run afoul of a notable podcast network. Back in 2011, Nerdist had its own drama that ended up in its shows being removed from Stitcher. That situation has since been cleared up, so there’s some potential for PodcastOne and Stitcher to heal their divide.

One thing is certain. As podcasting enters its tenth year, we can expect more of these types of disputes. Big players are here and in some cases, big money is at stake. This case of PodcastOne vs. Stitcher is only the beginning.

Podcast Advertising Negotiation and Execution

Hi folks a little background I have been executing advertising campaigns the past nine years as the CEO of RawVoice / Blubrry.com. And while the advertising landscape is changing, I want to share with you tenets of my success and give you guidelines that enable you to best negotiate and execute advertising deals.

Above all, I want all podcasters to be successful in their advertising campaigns — the more success we have as a collective the more money advertisers are going to invest in the space. The following is my process — you are welcome to use as-is and/or modify as you see fit.

When contacted by a company for podcast advertising, first find out if the individual is the information gatherer, the bottom-line signature authority or someone in between. This will help mold the initial phone conversation.

In that first call share your podcast philosophy with them and/or examples of successful campaigns you’ve executed. I tell the media buyer my background and advertising campaign experience; the production schedule of my show and its genesis/theme; the complete demographic of my audience with examples of who my listeners are; the nitty-gritty of how I execute campaigns; and lessons I have learned.

You want the advertiser to be confident in your ability to execute the advertising deal in which they’re going to invest their hard-earned dollars. As important, you will want to know how they found your show and why they think your show is going to be a good fit for their product or service.

It is critical early on that you get a budgeted dollar amount, otherwise you could end up putting a number of hours work into this to find out their budget is only a $100. If their budget is too small, I generally end the conversation gracefully. You can have situations where the budget is so small you would not be able to execute the campaign effectively. Don’t take the money unless you feel you can execute the campaign. If they have a large budget — more than you can move on your own — consider working with a company such as mine (RawVoice) to build a bigger campaign.

Ask them their campaign goals. This is where you get a feel if their budget is within expectations. Dig in and try to find out what it is currently costing them to acquire a customer. This provides insight on how you should price the campaign. My goal is to always deliver ROI that is lower than their acquisition costs. When you do that, they will spend money for a very long time. If it costs them $100 to gain a customer on radio and $150 with you, they will never renew.

When speaking to prospective advertisers, I make sure I describe the basics of how we would execute their campaign: introduction of the product through use cases, talking points on features and a special call to action to the audience. I always try to lock in a special price/offer that the listeners cannot find anyplace else.

I caution the advertiser about having a script; I push telling a story through talking points. I encourage the vendor to allow the ad to flow as natural as possible and ask them for source material, samples of the product or an account on their service so I can do my homework to best sell the product or service. One exception to the spontaneity is the call to action. This will always be scripted and never change from episode to episode. This hammers home how to obtain the product or deal being promoted.

As added value, I provide my advertisers a free banner ad above the fold, and put a sponsor message within my show notes with a trackable URL to their site. The listeners hear the ad and then see the ad on my website, which increases the likelihood of an action.

At this point, you can close the conversation and build an RFP (request for proposal). I always promise to deliver an official proposal by a specific date, along with providing the terms of the campaign.

Some media buyers have their own RFP, but they generally lay out what you are going to deliver and how much, start/stop date, ad frequency, ad length, banner sizes, CPM (cost per thousand), CPA (cost per acquisition) or flat-rate sponsorship rate, suggested text for the blog post and the cancellation terms.

The RFP is essentially the contract. Once you have a signed RFP, you need to be on your “A” game. You should do your very best to execute that campaign with the utmost respect and meet all the terms that you have agreed to.

Another aspect outlines what the sponsor is going to deliver to you before the start of the campaign:

  • Banners (correct size)
  • Product/service case studies
  • Talking points for your campaign
  • Call-to-action with promo code and/or landing page
  • Service or product trial

As a word of caution, if you have doubts about the vendor’s product or service, don’t sign the deal as your audience will smell that a mile away and the campaign will fail.

An important element in your pitch is to get the media buyer to understand the advantages of longer versus shorter campaigns. I try to get them to do a three-month campaign from the start. Why three months? It concerns the number of times the ad is heard. On traditional radio, their ad would be heard two to three times an hour. In my podcast it will be heard once an episode, twice a week. Our data shows the audience needs to hear the ad or variations of it three or four times before they make a buy or sign up for a service.

Those three to four exposures on my show will take two weeks. So in most campaigns, you see a minimum two week ramp up before you start seeing the campaign firing on all cylinders. At the end of 90 days, they will get a couple of weeks more of exposure due to the delay in audience listening. In my discussions with the advertiser I emphasize the on-demand listening aspect of podcasting that causes the ramp up period. A good analogy is how most of us, use our DVR’s most of us watch shows after they have aired the same applies to podcast listeners.

I explain that I offer a quick pre-roll at the beginning of the show, aka, “This show is sponsored in part by . . . ,” then do a full host endorsed sponsor spot within the first 25 percent of the show, lasting anywhere from 60 seconds to 3 minutes. Note: I take whatever time I need to get my point across in the sponsor spot.

Don’t get greedy! If they have a large budget make sure you are able to deliver the ROI according to what they are spending on your show. If you find an advertiser with a big budget, my company offers a finders fee based on gross ad spend of that vendor. We have some podcasters making more money from referrals than their podcast will ever deliver on its own. So do not be afraid to reach out.

Ask if their commerce system can handle a promo code and whether they would be willing to put up a trackable landing page. This is critical. You want to be guaranteed the ability to track and measure your campaign success. I use a third party banner-ad server so that if I need to show and display banners on websites or text-link click throughs as part of the campaign, I can ease the implementation for the advertiser. For that reporting I simply add them to the banner-ad’s reporting system so they get the banner-ad performance via the provider.

Most campaigns require a weekly report, episode link, ad time hack, certified downloads from Blubrry Podcast Statistics, and the link to the blog post. The vendor will be listening to you: Encourage them to critique each ad spot. Be ready to try a different approach if the campaign is not getting results and work with the vendor early and often to make tweaks to the campaign.

If the campaign is underperforming, do not be surprised if the vendor asks for more ad spots. My goal is to keep the vendor happy. I would rather give the them some more spots to bring performance in line and adjust the pricing for the next go-around versus losing the advertiser.

In closing, price your campaigns for success. As a rule of thumb the smaller the ad buy the more scrutiny the advertiser is going to have on your show and the campaign success. Never ever make your show appear bigger than it is. Use a reputable podcast statistics platform to backup your reporting so that when you are audited you come out smelling sweet.

I have shared an incredible amount of data here and I encourage you to go through this info a couple of times let me know @ ceo@rawvoice.com if this information helps you score an ad deal..
Happy podcasting and be a good ambassador for the space.

Todd..

Women in Podcasting: Interview with Soozi Baggs

Maternity Leavers Podcast Logo Podcasting NewsSoozi Baggs is the host of the Maternity Leavers podcast. She shares advice that can help guide pregnant women and mums to start their own businesses while they are on maternity leave. Her podcast is geared for women who are in the UK.

When did you first start podcasting? What’s your experience in podcasting from then to now?

I started really recently – only launching my show in June 2014. I’d known for months I was going to do it and I had a clear idea of the kind of show I wanted, but it wasn’t until April that I got my act together, found the time, and booked in several guests to get me started. Since then I’ve kept it going weekly up to episode 23. I’ve found lately though that I need more time for my one-to-one clients and have therefore switched the show to a monthly format for the foreseeable future. I still love doing it though and will be increasing the frequency again as soon as I can!

What inspired you to become a podcaster?

I studied a media course in my teenage years – I never even completed it! But one module that I got really involved in was the one about radio presenting and production. I learned all about the technical side of producing adverts and other snippits of audio, and I worked on two student radio stations – doing everything from writing and reading the news, to presenting a breakfast show and an afternoon show. Sadly, although I continued being a bit of a chatterbox, I never pursued any of my radio dreams, but I did consume masses of podcasts for years as I was commuting in London. So when I started my own business, making a podcast part of it was a natural choice.

What is maternity leave like in the UK? What sort of information can a person expect to hear about in your Maternity Leavers podcast?

Maternity Leave for most employees in the UK is 12 months. It’s paid for 9 months of that, and depending on your company, you may get more than the basic minimum too. So, if a woman takes off the full amount of time, that gives her a lot of time to plan a career change or to start a business. And that’s how Maternity Leavers itself came about – I help new mums on maternity leave to set up their own businesses. The podcast features interviews with women who started their own business when their children were young. We talk about how their business fitted in with their career direction at the time, and also discuss how they make it work in terms of childcare, productivity, working hours, and things like that – and of course their advice for mums just starting out.

What words of wisdom do you have for women who are thinking about starting their own podcast?

I would say if you feel drawn to it then definitely give it a go. If an open ended show seems daunting, commit yourself to a specific number (you don’t have to share this with anyone). If you love it, you’ll keep on going anyway!

And if you have guests, streamline your process as soon as possible. Many of my guests self selected themselves and contacted me after I put out a few calls on Facebook, which was great and saved me having to email lots of people. Then, an online scheduler that converts to the user’s local timezone is absolutely essential so they can book themselves in easily without sending emails back and forth about availability. Finally, encourage your guests to share their episode on all their social media channels, which will help your reach – and reassure them that the show came out great, in case they hate the sound of their own voice and don’t want to share it!

World of Podcasts 2014

World of Podcasts logoLast week, I attended the second World of Podcasts event in Anaheim, CA. World of Podcasts is dedicated to shows that cover Blizzard Entertainment and its video game franchises (most notably World of Warcraft). World of Podcasts takes place the night before BlizzCon, an annual convention organized by Blizzard to celebrate its existing games as well as reveal upcoming releases. And while World of Podcasts and BlizzCon do have a similar focus, the two events aren’t officially connected.

World of Podcasts 2014 was held at the Anaheim Hilton, which put the event right in the middle of much of the action that occurs adjacent to the Anaheim Convention Center and BlizzCon itself. At pretty much all hours of the day, conventioneers can be found gathered at the bar and in the lobby of the Hilton. It was the perfect venue for something like World of Podcasts. I also attended the first World of Podcasts in 2013. This year’s event eclipsed last year’s substantially.

In 2013, World of Podcasts was held in one room with a small sound system. The setup was problematic at times, as groups of people would often gather in the back of the room to talk, and those conversations would overpower the speakers at the front of the room. But this year, World of Podcasts spanned several rooms, which gave attendees plenty of space to spread out if they wanted to socialize. There was also a much better sound system, so live panels were more enjoyable for panelists and audience members alike.

[Read more…]

Women in Podcasting: Interview with Amy Robles

MilFamMonth podcasting newsAmy Robles is a mom and a military spouse. She is also a blogger and the creator of The Family Knot podcast.

Her podcast delves into the military lifestyle and offers advice for families who must learn to cope with the many changes and stresses that can happen when one spouse is in the military. The Family Knot seemed like the perfect podcast to highlight during November since it is Military Family Appreciation Month.

When did you first start podcasting? What’s your experience in podcasting from then to now?

So I am new podcaster, and can I just tell you that I LOVE this stuff! Next week will be my tenth episode of the show and I feel like we have worked out some the kinks and are making some great progress connecting with the audience. Woohoo!

It has been an incredible summer for me. I was the girl that would…ahem… “fight with the remote control,” and after a few months learning from Meron Bareket and Podcast Incubator I’ve been able to produce my show.

The Family Knot, is specifically focused on military spouses. These spouses have additional stress from: having a partner who is gone for long periods of time, possibly in danger; remaining a constant support for the rest of the family; moving to a completely new place every few years; and quite frankly, family finances can be tricky in the middle of all of this.

That’s why I created a show that is helping families, making a contribution, and reaching out to inspire spouses and combat the loneliness that can happen.

The best part of this entire experience is how much I’ve been able to grow, communicate with influential people, ask specific questions to help my audience get one step closer to reaching their dreams. Or figuring out a better way to handle the family finances. It’s all part of the big picture.

What inspired you to become a podcaster?

It’s been said “Write the book you want to read.” As I became friends with spouses in different branches of the military, whether Active Duty or Reserves, National Guard or the Navy, in any part of the world, I found some real commonalities.

Whether the deployment time is 90 days, 9 months, or even 18 months there are some similarities in the challenges that come from this life. Spouses can connect, build up one another and support each other through difficult times. That’s the only way to have a solid foundation when your other half is gone. You have to create it. Why wasn’t there a place where not just Army spouses or Marine spouses or Reserves Spouses get together, but we all get together to build a positive environment.

That’s precisely what inspired me to create The Family Knot.

Can you tell us more about The Family Knot? What topics does it focus on?

There’s two main areas of focus on the show. Each could be an independent show, but by combining the two we have reached a far greater number of families in the short time we’ve be running.

First, appreciating the challenges of military life. Not that they are wonderful. But they are manageable. By openly discussing challenges that are completely normal, (like fighting with your spouse before they leave for a long period of time. Who knew that was normal?) We can better understand our perspective and as a couple work through it. How about the challenge of making a new apartment, that is smaller than your last one, feel like home? What about helping your kids move into a new school, again? Are there strategies to help in these situations. This is what we discuss here.

Next, it is not easy to move from place to place and maintain consistent employment. A military spouse resume can be problematic. You’ve had how many 2 year jobs? And the jobs available can be lower paying, making child care even more costly to the family unit. The Family Knot explores employment and entrepreneurship opportunities from home. Interviews with business people working from home offer ideas for the military spouse. This way, the spouse can be home with children, if necessary, the position is location independent, and they can help with family finances.

What words of wisdom do you have for women who are thinking about starting their own podcast?

Look, girl. I get it. Creating a podcast is a whole new ball game. But I did it. And I am not a techie.

You can do it. Figure out who you are really talking to. What do they need to hear? What can you help them learn? You don’t have to be the expert, but you do have to ask the right questions. Involving others in your show builds your credibility. Ask for interviews with great guests.

You have no idea how much you can help others, how much fun this is and what you can accomplish! In fact, tweet me about your project @itsamyrobles I would love to cheer you on in your journey!

Women in Podcasting: Interview with Lisa Louise Cooke – PCN Show 007

Genealogy Gems Podcasting newsIn episode seven of the Podcaster News Show, I bring you more news about women in podcasting. This episode features an interview with Lisa Louise Cooke a woman whose name is well recognized in genealogy circles. She is involved in three podcasts that focus on genealogy and family history.

Links mentioned in this episode:
Genealogy Gems Podcast
Family History: Genealogy Made Easy Podcast
Family Tree Magazine Podcast

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A Decade of Podcasting

Little did I know the fate that awaited me when I sat down and recorded my first podcast on a hot autumn day in Waco, Texas. On Oct. 9, I celebrated 10 years in podcasting.

In the early 90s I ran the largest bulletin board system in the territory of Guam. What was I doing in Guam? Well before and during my podcasting days I was active duty in the U.S. Navy. I retired in 2007 to do podcasting full time.

So from about 1990 to 2002 I ran a BBS and when that space died, I started blogging . . . I admit I was not that great of a blogger. But the two things had something in common: the BBS and the blog allowed me to communicate with like-minded people.

In June 2004 I was involved in a swimming pool accident that nearly left me paralyzed. The doc said I was a “3 percenter” — 97 percent of the people that suffered my injury are left paralyzed the rest of their lives. That experience left me wanting to make a difference in people’s lives and I started seeking a way to fulfill that.

During the months of recovery I made myself useful to the Navy by doing administrative jobs that landed me in Waco overseeing the taxpayers’ dollars that were being spent on the modification of airplanes. With Texas being 100 degrees in the shade, and me being constrained to a clamshell body brace, air conditioning was my best friend.

So on Oct. 8 I discovered podcasting pioneers Dave Winer and Adam Curry on “Scripting News.” I was like a fish that had not seen a meal in a year — hooked. My first show, on Oct. 9, lasted 43 minutes and reached 500-1,000 listeners; about five times as many as had ever read my blog in a single day. I knew I was on to something big.

In the early days the biggest challenge was securing enough hosting accounts to keep the show online. Bandwidth was expensive, and for the first year I had no less than 18 hosting accounts to support eight episodes a month. I would put an episode up, blow out the monthly bandwidth allowance on that host within 36 hours, and then change the media source until I blew out the next hosting account allotment.

The show quickly grew to more than 65,000 listeners. Those where the glory days of podcasting, yet I marvel that we all did not go broke. But things were evolving. In January 2005 I wrote the first book on podcasting “Podcasting the Do it Yourself Guide.” We sold over 47,000 copies of that book, a record for a tech book. We received several awards, including one from Amazon and another from the New York Times. And that kept me out of the poor house.

In July 2005 GoDaddy approached me and offered to sponsor my show, which was exciting as my wife had instituted a two-year deadline to make the show profitable. After a few months I was asked by GoDaddy rep Kris Redlinger the now-famous question that changed everything: “Do you know other podcasts we could advertise in?” It was as if I had been struck by lightning, a business instantly formulated in my head.

On my next show I did a shout-out asking for a Web developer/ programmer, business developer, graphics guy and a lawyer. From that call-out on my show we built RawVoice. The rest is history. RawVoice was built with fans of my show: Four of the five principles RawVoice started with are still primary owners in the company.

Honestly, the past 10 years have been a whirlwind and I admit that being one of the first 50 or so podcasters was pretty cool. Hundreds of thousands have come and gone since then and today we still see new shows launching nearly every day — people with a voice and a passion to discuss every possible topic under the sun.

The principles of podcasting have not changed since Day 1, and I chuckle when someone has a new scheme about how to get into the new and noteworthy section of iTunes. When I walked both ways uphill in the snow to do my podcast, there was no podcast section in iTunes let alone “new and noteworthy.” We had to win the audience over by content. Content and passion will remain the formula that wins the hearts, minds and loyalty of podcast audiences.

While I do consider myself what us Navy guys call a plankowner — a crew member who is part of a inaugural crew when the ship is commissioned — in the podcasting space, I am overjoyed every day when I learn something new or consider a new podcasting technique. But one thing for sure is I am not the same podcaster that started on that hot steamy day in Waco, Texas, in a dingy hotel room.

The podcasting journey has been my therapy. My audience experienced the death of my father on the day of my 200th episode. The response I received to the 5-minute announcement I made to my audience explaining why there would be no show that night still amazes me, and also made me realize what podcasting was really about. I got more than 5,000 emails from my family of listeners with words of condolence, and my family of listeners sent dozens of bouquets of flowers to my father’s funeral.

Notice I say my “Family of Listeners”. On my show, every listener is part of my “ohana.” From Google, “The word ʻohana means family in the Hawaiian language, but in a wider sense to include not only one’s closer relatives, but also one’s cousins, in laws, friends, race, and other neighbours,” and in my case my audience.

Once you start thinking about your audience as an extended part of your family your relationship with them will change and you will become a more engaged podcaster.

So as I start my second 10 years in podcasting, I hope that you will consider the legacy you are creating, the lives you’re molding and make your voice one that will not be forgotten.

As I approach my one-thousandth show, I hope you will tune into my podcast and let me share in much deeper detail what I have attempted to share with you today in written word. It sure is a hell of a lot easier to just podcast it.

Happy Podcasting
Todd Cochrane
Host Geek News Central
CEO RawVoice